Rose Salseda

Assistant Professor
Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 2018
M.A., University of Texas at Austin, 2009
B.A., California State University, Fullerton, 2007

Rose Salseda is an assistant professor in the Department of Art & Art History and a faculty affiliate with the Center for Comparative Studies in Race & Ethnicity; African & African American Studies; the Center for Latin American Studies; and American Studies at Stanford University. Specializing in the fields of African American and U.S. Latinx art, and with a research background in the art of the African Diaspora in Latin America and the Caribbean, Professor Salseda’s research explores the politics of race, identity, and representation. Her first book, Unrest: An Art History of the 1992 Los Angeles Riots, foregrounds uprising as a response to the injustices of state violence. Closely reading artworks made by three generations of artists, she reveals how artists have challenged racially polarizing media portrayals and accounts of the 1992 uprising and underscored the complex intergenerational, cross-racial, and immigrant experiences of anti-Black racism and xenophobia in the United States and beyond.

In addition to her scholarly work on uprisings, Professor Salseda has interests in the intersections of visual and performance art with underground and popular music as well as the strategies of appropriation used by Black and Brown artists to critique discrimination and inequities in society. She is a founding co-director of the U.S. Latinx Art Forum, a non-profit and professional organization, where she has spearheaded and implemented data collections and research initiatives on the field of Latinx art, tracking its growth in academia, targeting areas for advocacy, and overseeing the development of resource lists on Latinx artists and institutions. She also gives talks, leads workshops, and consults art world and academic leaders on Latinx art, the state of the field, and its relationship to other areas of study.

Professor Salseda is the fourth generation of her family to have been raised in South Central Los Angeles and its surrounding neighborhoods. She is a first-generation college student whose family, art and community ties in Southern California continue to inspire and motivate her work.

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Undergraduate Courses:

African American Art

Black and Brown: American Artists of Color

Censorship in American Art

Los Angeles Arts Immersion

Riot: Visualizing Civil Unrest in the 20th and 21st Centuries

U.S. Latinx Art

Graduate Courses:

The Art of Punk: Sound, Aesthetics, and Performance

Complicating Minimal Art: Racializing and Queering a Canon

Riot: Visualizing Civil Unrest in the 20th and 21st Centuries

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Selection of Writing:

Rose Salseda, "White Justice Doesn’t Work for Us: The Xicanx Body at the Intersection of Struggle," In Xicana.o.x Body, edited by Cecilia Fajardo-Hill, Marissa Del Toro, (American Federation of Arts and the Phoenix Art Museum), Forthcoming

-- “Shared Struggles.” In Estamos Bien, edited by Rodrigo Moura, Susanna V. Temkin, Elia Alba (New York: El Museo del Barrio, 2021), 309-14

-- “Creating Equity in Academia for Latinx Art History,” Latin American & Latinx Visual Culture (2019) 1 (30): 87-91

-- “Black and Blue and Brown: Artist Depicts Police Brutality,” KCET ArtBound, January 25, 2017

-- “Vision in Ruins: Michelle Dizon’s Civil Society," Contemptorary, April 19, 2016

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Press:

Elaine Velie, "15 Latinx Artist Fellows Receive $50K Grants," Hyperallergic, May 15, 2022

Maximiliano Duron, "'We Have to Mobilize’: Latinx Art Scholars Talk Representation with the College Art Association,” ARTnews, February 16, 2017

-- “Study: Latino Art Underrepresented at College Art Association’s Annual Conference,” ARTnews, September 20, 2016

Seph Rodney, “Group Calls for Greater Latinx Participation in the College Art Association Conference,” Hyperallergic, August 30, 2016