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Andy Schocken

Andy Schocken

About

Andy Schocken began his documentary film work at Seattle's PBS affiliate KCTS, and then spent several years producing promotional videos for nonprofit organizations. His short film work before arriving at Stanford includes Not Without A Fight, a documentary on the Seattle WTO protests, and Live @ 5, a parody of local TV news.

 

Probation

digital video

JUNE, 2004
VIDEO DURATION: 20:45 MIN.

Focusing on the relationships between a juvenile probation officer and the kids on her caseload, Probation explores the connections between mental illness and juvenile delinquency.

 

Old Glory

16mm color film

JUNE, 2003
VIDEO DURATION: 7:03 MIN.
A survey of nouveau-patriot fashion statements, innovative merchandising concepts, and xenophobic political rallies, Old Glory is a satirical look at the role of the Stars and Stripes in post-9/11 culture.

Awards, Festivals, and Screenings

San Francisco International Film Festival, 2004
Slamdance Film Festival, 2004
Rotterdam International Film Festival, 2004
Cinequest Film Festival, 2004
Palm Springs International Festival of Short Films, 2003
Cucalorus Film Festival , 2004
Olympia Film Festival, 2003
NYU International Student Festival, 2003
Beijing Film Academy Interational Film Festival, 2003
1 Reel Film Festival, 2003
Maryland Film Festival, 2004
 

Watershed

digital video

Co-directed by Liam Dalzell
MARCH, 2003
VIDEO DURATION: 11:20 MIN.
On the Klamath River, it's not only the fish that are endangered. Amidst another round of the western water wars, Watershed looks at the ways of life along the river that are being threatened with extinction.

Awards, Festivals, and Screenings

American Indian Film Festival, 2003
Olympia Film Festival, 2003
Cantor Arts Center, 2003
Ashland Independent Film Festival
1 Reel Film Festival
Hazel Wolf Environmental Film Festival
San Francisco Ocean Film Festival
 

Remote Control

16mm black and white film

DECEMBER, 2002
VIDEO DURATION: 3 MIN.
Human minds are free to roam the furthest reaches of the universe, but our sensory experience is limited by a woefully insufficient sack of skin and bones. Or is it? Remote Control envisions a future where mechanical sensors and transistors extend the human perception of touch into worlds beyond our own.

Awards, Festivals, and Screenings

Cantor Arts Center, 2003